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Calories




  1. Where can I find a dietitian who can calculate how many calories I eat? Answer
  2. I'm am looking for software that will allow me to enter in a recipe with weights, ingredients and serving size then calculate the nutritional breakdown. Answer
  3. How many calories are there in calcium? Answer
  4. Would you provide me with the name of nutrition software so that I can take a look at it and see if it is something I may want to purchase? Answer
  5. I was trying very hard to find out the calories content in Moon cakes and kebabs. Answer
  6. Is there software that prepares menus with the recipes, nutritional info and grocery list? Answer
  7. Are there any web sites with a program that will calculate my total calorie intake? Answer
  8. I have heard about some certain foods that use more calories to digest than they contain. What are they? Answer
  9. I was wondering if you could give me any ideas about which nutrition analysis software to use? Answer


  10. I would appreciate it if you would tell me the calorie and fat count in 1 ounce of fresh buffalo mozzarella? Answer
  11. Can you refer me to a website which contains a rather complete table of calorie content for a large list of foods? Answer
  12. Could you please tell me how many calories are in one teaspoon of sugar? Answer
  13. Is there a way that I can find out how many calories I eat? Answer
  14. How much food does the average American eat a day? Answer
  15. Do I count calories or calories from fat? Answer
  16. I'm wondering where I might be able to find dietary information about sushi? Answer
  17. Which has more calories, a slice of regular bread or toast? Answer


Where can I find a dietitian who can calculate how many calories I eat?

The Medical Nutrition and Nutrition Entrepreneurs dietetic practice groups of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics can calculate your calorie intake from your food records and make recommendations for healthy eating changes. Dietitians often have their own private practice nutrition counseling services in addition to services provided in a clinic or hospital. You can find a dietitian at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Include your zip code or city / state, the type of service you want (individual consultation) and expertise needed.


I'm am looking for software that will allow me to enter in a recipe with weights, ingredients and serving size then calculate the nutritional breakdown (protein, fat, carbs, sodium and sugar) along with calories. Is there such software?

There are several nutrition websites that provide nutrient analysis of recipes. The best source of food nutrient data is the USDA Nutrient Database. I would recommend Food Processor, software used by dietitians, to analyze recipes.


I am preparing the food chart for my father-in-law on which I have proteins, carbohydrates, fats and calcium. I have got that 1 gram produces 9 calories of fat, 4 calories of carbohydrate, 4 calories of protein, but I could not find anywhere that how many calories are there in 1 milligram of calcium which I suppose 1,200 mg is required for a person above 50 years. I will really appreciate if you can reply me on this.

There are no calories in vitamins or minerals. Calcium is a mineral therefore it has no calories.

The human body runs on food that yields energy (fuel) as calories that internal organs and muscles need to function. Only fat, alcohol, carbohydrate and protein produce energy the body can use.

Instead of preparing a food chart, why not use a nutrition analysis software program to do the analysis for you? Read below.


You mentioned that is nutrition analysis software available. Would you provide me with the name of this software so that I can take a look at it and see if it is something I may want to purchase? Thank you,

There are websites that will analyze your food intake / recipes and there are software programs that you can install on your Windows computer. I can only recommend one professional software program as I know dietitians were involved in the development of the software and nutrient databases. Read below.


I was trying very hard to find out the calories content in Moon cakes, a traditional Chinese recipe made for celebration during moon cakes festival.

Also, I want to know the calories content in kebabs, include mutton, beef and chicken kebabs wrapped with pita bread. Many thanks.

Sorry, but don't have a recipe for Moon cakes nor a nutritional analysis. I would recommend doing a nutrient analysis with a nutrition software program based on the number of servings in your recipe.

With regards to kebabs, it would depend on what meat and what veggies or fruit are on the kebabs, let alone any other condiments on the pita sandwich. I would also recommend a nutrient analysis for this recipe. Hopefully you meant lamb, not mutton which is not very edible because it refers to the tough meat of a sheep that is more than 1 year old.


I gave a talk tonight and some inquired about a list of software that prepares menus with the recipes, nutritional info and grocery list. I was sure there is software out there like that as patients have mentioned it to me. Do you or could you get me a list of nutrition software that includes this type of menu planning with the analysis and grocery list as well? I will appreciate a prompt reply. Thank you!!!!

There are programs in retail software stores and food analysis websites, but I wonder if a dietitian was involved in development? It is a question of whether accurate formulas were used in creating in the software. In addition, nutrient databases should be sufficiently large enough to provide foods to analyze most menus and recipes. There are other nutrient database concerns like how many nutrients and how much nutrient data is missing.

The software programs that I would suggest are designed for dietitians and cost over $600 each (Food Processor is one I would recommend). It would be more costly than consumers may pay.


Where can I get a nutrition analysis software program? How expensive are they? Are there any web sites with a program that will calculate my total calorie intake?

The problem is to find valid nutrition analysis software for either your computer or online. The key issues are algorithms that run the software and how is the nutrient data for foods created and manipulated. Nutrition analysis software programs that are reliable are marketed to nutrition professionals and cost over $600. I do not use any of the many websites that provide nutrient analysis of recipes and menus so I can't recommend one in particular.

Here's my top 10 questions to ask about nutrition analysis software.

  1. Is a dietitian involved in deciding which formulas are used in the software that determine body weight, BMI (Body Mass Index), calorie calculations, manipulates nutrient data, etc? There are many formulas that could be used, some supported by research others are not.
  2. How many foods are in the food database? You need a large enough food database to provide enough foods (packaged brand name foods, generic foods like fruits and vegetables as well as restaurant menu foods) to analyze the meals and recipes you eat.
  3. What is the source of the nutrient data? USDA, food manufacturers and fast food or national chain restaurants are the primary sources. You'll want to analyze your recipes so that you can add servings of your recipes to the meals you eat.
  4. How often is the food database updated? When was the food database last updated? New foods enter the grocery market every year while others are discontinued so you need an updated food database to find the foods you eat.
  5. How many nutrients are listed for each food? Food labels of manufactured brand name foods usually list only 2 vitamins (vitamin A and C) and 2 minerals (calcium and iron). The RDA has 32 required nutrients (protein, carbohydrate, fiber, 14 vitamins and 15 minerals). You'll want to know if the food you eat meets your RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowance) and what the calorie, fat (total, saturated, trans, cholesterol), sodium and fiber content of foods are to reduce your health risks from food.
  6. What percent of foods in the nutrient database contain blank or missing data? This will cause your analyzed recipes and menus to appear low in some nutrients for which there is missing nutrient data. Is any nutrient data imputed? This means the software company added nutrient data for nutrients with blank or missing values. Did they use scientific algorithms to impute data?
  7. Do they validate the nutrient database to ensure that any manually entered data does not contain any data entry errors?
  8. Does it store your meals and recipes so that you can compare your food intake on different days / months or see an average over time?
  9. What are the fees for the software and receiving annual database updates for your computer? Can you return the software within 30 days if it does not meet your needs and get a full refund? Do they provide customer support either as online chats, email or a toll free number?
  10. How easy is the software to use and does it provide you with meaningful reports and charts?


I am quite sure that you are flooded with a million requests a day and I would like to thank you ahead of time if you manage to find the time to attend to my request.

I am a young healthy woman who is getting ready to get married and has gained a few pounds (7) since first buying my wedding gown. I do not feel the need for a full blown diet, but I have heard about some certain foods that use more calories to digest than they contain, making minimal weight loss easier.

If you find the time in your busy schedule could you e-mail me a list of these foods so that I may lose these few pounds? Thanks again for your time and valued expertise.

There are few foods that use more calories to digest than they contain (ice water and celery are 2), but they wouldn't contribute to weight loss since there are no calories in water and very few in celery. You can easily lose 7 pounds in the next 4 months or even 2 months through gradually reducing calories and increasing exercise. Make it a lifetime commitment.

You did not say what your height and weight are so I can't comment on whether or not weight loss would be advised for you, but you seem to have a compelling reason - a paid for wedding dress that you probably don't want to alter.

Perhaps you should make an appointment to see a registered dietitian who could assess your weight and create a healthy weight loss eating plan that would include your food preferences and time schedule. You could also discuss how to deal with the pre-wedding parties that could contribute additional weight gain.


I've noticed that you refer several times (on your website) to nutrition analysis software. I was wondering if you could give me any ideas concerning this. I have one that is pretty old and outdated (very limited products). Can you suggest any specific ones or companies or anything? I'd appreciate it.

I designed several nutrition software programs for several software companies. Unfortunately the Windows and Palm OS products I designed are no longer available. Other than that, there are nutrition professional software titles that run >$600 each.

I would suggest you look for a nutrition analysis software program that has a dietitian working on development, closely scrutinize the nutrient database, nutrients analyzed and features. Otherwise, you may be missing nutrient values or using inappropriate algorithms to calculate nutrient needs.


I would appreciate it if you would tell me the calorie and fat count in 1 ounce of fresh buffalo mozzarella?

Don't know and I searched huge food databases that I have to search for nutrient data. I would recommend you ask the manufacturer for nutritional data or read the food label. This cheese is made in Italy from Asian water buffalo.

Calories and fat would depend on whether whole or skim milk was used to make the mozzarella cheese. Usually partially skim milk is used in making mozzarella, so I would guess that might be the same with buffalo milk.

FYI, 1 cup whole buffalo milk has 235 calories and 16.8 grams of fat. Some of the water in the milk would be removed during the cheese making process. 1 cup of cow's milk has 170 calories and 5 grams of fat. So buffalo milk is much higher in fat than cow's milk.


Can you refer me to a website which contains a rather complete table of calorie content for a large list of foods, preferably in units of the more rational calories / grams, but alternatively in the more common units of calories per ounce or serving size?

The USDA has a great lookup tool for individual foods at the USDA Food Composition Database.

I am curious as to why you would want a complete list of calories for foods in household measures i.e. common serving sizes? If you want to keep track of your food intake, try nutrition analysis software that has a rather large database of generic and brand name foods.

Rather than looking up individual foods, why not keep track of the foods you eat and the recipes you make for meals? A complete nutrition analysis software program should do that rather easily for you and should store recipes and meals you enter. That way, you can keep track of your calorie intake as well as vitamins and minerals from individual foods and ingredients in a recipe.




Could you please tell me how many calories are in one teaspoon of sugar? Many thanks.

In one level teaspoon of sugar has 16 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. One rounded teaspoon has 1 1/2 tsp and 24 calories with 6 grams of carbohydrate. Depends on how you measure one teaspoon i.e. measuring spoon or silverware spoon.


Just like the next person, I'm concerned about how many calories I eat. Unfortunately, I don't really know how many I'm getting. Is there a way that I can find out?

You can take several approaches depending on how much time you want to spend.

First you need to write down everything you eat or drink. Remember to include any supplements you take.

One approach would be to use the Nutrition Facts on the food label. Compare the serving size on the food label (which determines the calorie content) to the serving size you ate. Multiply the calorie value of the serving size on the Nutrition Facts label by how many servings that size that you ate. (For instance say a 2 tablespoon serving of salad dressing has 80 calories and you typically use 4 tablespoons. Then you had 80 x two servings or 160 calories.) Write down that calorie value in a column next to the foods you ate. Repeat for each food you eat that day and add up the total. Now repeat this process for the next 7 days to get an average of the calories you eat each week including weekdays and weekends. Since you eat differently on weekdays than on weekends, a weeklong analysis is more representative of what you eat on a usual basis. One problem with this approach is many simple foods like fruits, vegetables and meats do not have food labels with serving sizes and corresponding calorie values. Another problem is that 40% of meals are eaten outside the home in the U.S. How would you enter calories / nutrients that don't have food labels or nutritional information?

A second approach would be to give your food records to a registered dietitian who could do a nutrient analysis of your food intake over a week. They may even provide graphics that show what percent of the food you eat is fat, carbohydrate or protein.

A third approach would be for you to analyze your food records yourself with some nutrition analysis software. It does require some time commitment to enter all the foods, beverages and recipes for foods you eat throughout a week.

The bottom line is if you eat more calories than you expend, you will gain weight. Research has proven that the people who lose weight and keep the weight off keep food records.




How much food does the average American eat a day?

Depends on whether the person is a man or woman and their age. It also depends on how you count "food eaten". Food eaten can be measured in pounds of food sold to grocery stores or in calories eaten at home. Since foods have different weights and can have different calorie amounts, the results vary.

Food delivered to grocery stores is measured in pounds of food not including alcoholic beverages. This includes 1,100 calories per person that are either stolen or spoiled and thrown away by the grocer or consumer during cooking or due to plate waste. Measured this way in 2004 and 2005 (latest years data is available), the average American "eats" about 3,900 calories per person per day (including the 1,100 calories of wasted food). These calories come from milk (1.8 cups), meat, eggs and nuts (6.5 ounces), flour and cereal products (7.5 ounces), fruits (0.8 cups) and vegetables (1.7 cups), fats (71.6 grams or 14.3 teaspoons) and sweets (29.8 teaspoons).

People's activities have changed a lot since 1909 when cars, televisions and computers were not available. In 1909, people were more active in their jobs (physical laborers or farmers) and in their leisure activities (walking, biking or riding a horse). However, we spend too much time inactive. We can't continue to eat as if we were a farmer working the soil using a horse and plow.

What also has changed is where people in 1909 got their 3,500 calories per day. Back in 1909 we ate mostly (57%) carbohydrates (starches), about the same amount of protein (12%) and less fat (31%) probably because of eating wild game and leaner livestock. From 1951 to 1965 Americans had the lowest calorie consumption since 1909 at 3,100 calories or 800 calories lower than in 2005. The highest food consumption since 1909 was 2001 with 4,000 calories per person per day. In 2004, we reached the highest fat consumption at 41.3%. Hopefully people are listening to the message to reduce calories and fat. Carbohydrate consumption has dropped since 1909's high of 57% to the lowest 49% in 1964 to 1965. Since 1970, we have decreased our consumption of sugar by 28% and increased our consumption of corn sweeteners by almost 490% probably in carbonated beverages and processed foods.

Food eaten can also be counted as food consumed at home and away from home as calories. The government periodically surveys Americans to find out what they are eating and the latest results from the year 2000 are 2,666 calories per day (by men) and 1,877 (by women) with 49% carbohydrates (by men) and 52% (by women), 33% fat (by men and women), 11% saturated fats (by men and women), 16% protein (by men) and 15% (by women).


Do I count calories or calories from fat?


Depends on why you are counting.

Counting total calories is helpful to maintain body weight. Counting fat is helpful to reduce your risk of heart disease and cancer.

It might be easier to keep track of the grams of fat you eat each day. To determine how many grams of fat you should eat, try the Healthy Body Calculator and include your weight goal.

Another figure you can track is the percent Daily Value for the amount of fat in the foods you eat. This number is on food labels listed by the grams and calories of fat in the food you eat. Add up the percent fat Daily Value for the servings of foods you eat. When you have reached 100%, you have reached the recommended amount of fat in a 2,000 calorie eating plan.


Hello, I'm wondering where I might be able to find dietary information about sushi, i.e., fat content, dietary fiber content and nutritional information about sushi in general. Do you know where I might find that type of information?

Sushi is going to vary greatly from restaurant to restaurant depending on the fish, seaweed, rice and other vegetable ingredients. Generally sushi is low in fat (if made from raw fish) and low in fiber due to the use of white rice though the seaweed and other vegetables will add some fiber. The fish (salmon, tuna) can be high in omega 3 fatty acids which is good for heart health.

I would suggest you look for nutrition analysis software which has the nutrient content of foods (including restaurant menu items) and allows you to build a sushi recipe with ingredients.


Which has more calories, a slice of regular bread or toast?

The calorie and nutrient content of bread is about the same whether it is toasted or not. Also, it does not differ significantly between white, rye or whole wheat breads or toasts. There are approximately 66 to 83 calories per slice of bread. There are diet breads on the market, which have slightly lower calorie values, but I do not recommend diet products. I encourage people to buy regular food and control portion sizes.






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